Assistant Professor at the University of Pittsburgh

Studying Massive Galaxy Growth, Evolution, and Dynamics through Cosmic Time

I am an observational astronomer and am currently an assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh. I use a variety of ground and space-based telescopes to empirically study the evolution of massive galaxies.

I have been involved with a number of large galaxy surveys spanning from the local Universe to a few billion years after the Big Bang including the NMBS, 3D-HST, and OBEY surveys as well as smaller spectroscopic surveys.

I have leadership roles in two large spectroscopic programs, CHOMP and LEGA-C that aim to revolutionize our understanding of the physics of galaxy formation over half the age of the Universe.

I received my PhD in 2013 from Yale University under the supervision of Dr. Pieter van Dokkum.